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Copenhagen’s urban development takes strides into the future

The construction of the city’s new Vejlands Quarter will begin sometime in early 2021 and will be built entirely out of timber

  • August 19, 2020 09:30
  • Author Anton Stoyanov
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If you needed more proof that Denmark and its capital Copenhagen are ahead of the curve when it comes to protecting the environment and fighting climate change with all resources at their disposal, then look no further. Currently, local authorities in the city are engaged in pre-planning for the construction of Copenhagen’s newest neighbourhood – the Vejlands Quarter which will effectively symbolize Denmark’s level of engagement in the fight against climate change.

The way forward is paved with wood

Vejlands Quarter is scheduled to begin construction sometime in early 2021 and it comes with a special twist – it will be made entirely out of timber. The new neighbourhood will turn a what used to be dumping ground into the very embodiment of climate ambition by creating the grounds for life amid and in-tune with nature.

The Vejlands Quarter, its ingenuity and the statement it makes have also been recognized by the prestigious Architizer Awards, receiving the top prize in the Unbuilt Masterplan category, highlighting the many quirks and innovative practices that will be involved in its construction.

Some of the most curious aspects of the yet-to-be-built neighbourhood include:

  • Having all residential buildings be constructed entirely out of wood and timber
  • Having birdhouses and animal habitats directly integrated into the residential buildings
  • Having some 40% of the area be dedicated entirely to the landscape, which will first be thoroughly renovated and restored to its past glory

The Vejlands Quarter will also play a key role in fulfilling Copenhagen’s climate goals. Amid increasing urbanization, the need for more housing in cities often leads to massive construction sites that emit tons of CO2 – yet that is not the case when the primary material that is used for such buildings is wood. Thus, by adopting more widespread use of timber, authorities in the Danish capital are acting on solving problems simultaneously – mixing housing and environmental concerns together.



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