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Elron will procure six new dual-system electric trains

The call follows the government's decision to upgrade the fleet amidst growing train traffic in Estonia

  • January 23, 2020 16:00
  • Author Plamen Petrov
Medium tallinn elron 1401 01
Ad Meskens, Wikipedia (CC BY 3.0)

Eesti Liinirongid AS (ELRON) had launched a call for six dual-system electric trains with the option of ordering ten additional trains in the future, the all-Estonian passenger rail operator announced in a press release.

The public transport company specified that the procurement follows the government's decision to upgrade the train fleet amidst constantly growing number of passengers and crowded popular lines.

The deadline for participation in the procurement is 01.06.2020 and the expected delivery time for the trains is in the second half of 2024. They will service the electrified railway line Tallinn-Tartu, which will be completed in December 2024.

Conceding that it is difficult to attract the interest of train manufacturers with such a small order, Elron named as potential bidders the current train manufacturer Stadler and Škoda, who are building similar trains for neighbouring Latvia.

More and softer seats, light meals on board

The new trains will have better seating capacity and, in the summer months, removal of some of the portable seats will make more room for bikes. Feedback from passengers will be considered to make the seats more comfortable and softer, and to provide a lighter meal option on trains, especially in the form of hot drinks and snacks.

As far as technical specifications are concerned, the operator stresses that the trains to be procured are dual-system electric trains. That means that they can run on both the old catenary and the new electrified sections of Estonia’s railroads. Due primarily to the maintenance facilities at Elron’s depot, the new trains will have a maximum length of 85 meters.

Trains running in Estonia are tailored to its needs as the Baltic country has a wider railway and wider and lower train wagons than most other countries.

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