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Trieste is Italy's Adriatic trading gateway

Trieste becomes epicentre of Italian anti-green pass protests

Trieste becomes epicentre of Italian anti-green pass protests

Picketing port workers could seriously disrupt Italy’s supply chains

Trieste dock workers have started a blockade on the operations of Italy’s most important commercial port in a bid to draw attention to their demands to overturn the compulsory imposition of the Green Pass. That seems to be yet a new episode in the continuing saga of resistance against the governmental restriction, which caused violent protests and arrests in Rome during the past weekend.

Trieste is also the main oil terminal in the Mediterranean

Italy’s government plan on obligatory green passes at work is set out to affect 23 million workers in the country as of today. The certificate does not require employees to be vaccinated, however, in that case, they would have to present proof for a negative COVID test result or proof of recovery from the infection. If people choose to go the testing route, however, they will have to pay 15 euros and get the test done every 48 hours.

The interior ministry tried to make a concession, in order to keep the port's essential activities in operation, by offering dockers free coronavirus tests until 31 December, when the measure is due to expire.

However, the Trieste dockers refused the offer, calling instead for the Green Pass obligation to be dropped altogether. The Ministry’s move also drew criticism from the opposition, such as Matteo Salvini, whose party argued that this creates an unfair situation where the logistics sector would be placed in a preferential position.

La Stampa reported that the mood at the port blockade this morning was peaceful and the atmosphere was jovial since the participants have repeated that it is advisable to keep the tone low and avoid any provocation and wave banners. The demonstration is, after all, unauthorized and there would be a risk of eviction in case of excessive incidents.

What the demonstration has achieved is prevent trucks from entering the port area, even though technically speaking the port remains functioning.

40% of Trieste’s port workers do not have health passes, according to estimates.

"It is not known how long the protest will last," explained Fabio Tuiach, speaking to La Stampa, a picketer who wandered around the entrance with a megaphone around his neck. "Of course, a week of blockade would be great damage for us too, but this battle must be fought, there are no alternatives."

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