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Split’s new budget marks significant progress for the Croatian city

Split’s new budget marks significant progress for the Croatian city

Authorities will have some 1.3 billion kuna at their disposal in 2021

Local officials in Split have officially adopted their new city budget amount to some 1.3 billion kuna. This marks an important step in the city’s growth as it puts on full display the progress that the city has made over the last couple of years as it has grown considerable despite the many difficulties.

Rising from the ashes

After a full day of discussion on public needs programs, at the 41st session of the City Council, the Budget of the City of Split for 2021 was adopted with projections for 2022 and 2023 in the amount of 1.3 billion kuna.

Support for the city's most important financial document was given by 19 city councillors, while 7 were against. The proposal and explanation of the Budget were presented to the city councillors by the authorized head of the Administrative Department for Financial Management and Controlling, Olenka Dadić.

Following the adoption, Mayor Andro Krstulović Opara thanked all the councillors who participated in the debate, explaining that all amendments testify to the desire and will for the Budget for next year to be of high quality and to be useful for our city and our citizens.

He continued, stating that the Budget for 2021 is a huge step forward for the City of Split compared to the first budget of its administration in 2017  “Today our budget is one billion and 300 million kuna, then, in 2017 it was 860 million kuna. It's a huge step forward. We inherited a City that had no mayor and no budget. We fixed our cash register. This year has been successful, we have not stopped any of the investments we have started. We continue to make those investments, we are finishing the processes and we do not want to leave unfinished business” concluded Mayor Krstulović Opara.

The stark rise in budgetary funds is especially impressive in the context of the coronavirus pandemic, throughout which local governments in Europe have been experiencing severe financial difficulties. Nonetheless, officials in Split are eagerly awaiting a better and more productive 2021, standing by with more cash in hand.

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